ACCESS TO THE E-LEARNING PLATFORM:
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ANALYSIS OF THE PRESENT SITUATION

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The number of blind and visually impaired children between 0 and 4 years old is relatively small, but the impact of these early years of visual difficulties is critical to establish their future inclusion possibilities.

At the time of birth, an index of 1 per 3000 live births is estimated to be blind or have severe visual impairment. While some children without these problems come to learn mainly through sight, reading and receiving stimuli with their eyes, others, however, although they can manage getting around space using their visual remnants to move, must use their senses of hearing and touch for learning. A minority also lacks a minimum sight for both mobility and educational purposes. All of the above, plus the moment of appearance of the impairment and its evolution, will influence on the overall development of the child and will require different psychopedagogical treatments.

The many studies carried out on children suffering from mild and severe visual deficiencies have proven that developing care mechanisms as early as possible is paramount for them to reach an appropriate maturity and to achieve full inclusion in their families, school, and also socially, without their visual handicap preventing a healthy development.

This early attention to children with visual impairment should begin before 4 years of age and should direct its efforts towards providing stimuli appropriate to their childhood development stage, but considering each individual case. This must be an enriching and compensating mechanism; its true objective is to ease miscellaneous situations, not improvised, with specific stimuli that improve the child’s development in various areas: motor, cognitive, social, language, and personal autonomy abilities.

LOW VISION CHILDHOOD IN EDUCATION

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Some years ago, the specific education for children with blindness or severe visual impairment was mainly carried out in family or controlled environments for specific training, isolated from the rest of pre-primary schools.

However, new studies (such as “La inclusión en la educación: Como hacerla realidad” from “Foro Educativo”, the “Manual de Educación Inclusiva, pág. 16. Ministerio de Educación, 2006, Lima-Perú” or the Primer “Abramos paso a la escuela inclusiva”) advocate for the education of blind children along with non-impaired children in regular schools. This Integrated education offers more possibilities of psychosocial development than a segregated one, which has more protectionist traits.

The goal of this type of education is the social and occupational integration of the blind, so that the latter becomes an individual capable of normally participating and interacting with non-visually impaired people and to have the same productivity and efficiency than they have.

IN EUROPE

In last years the low vision childhood in schools has increased to the majority. The integration of students with special educational needs in European educational systems in 2005 and 2012 are:

Italy99,00%
Iceland94,10%
malt90,50%
Norway90,30%
Lithuania90,00%
Spain83,50%
Ireland80,30%
Hungary62,10%
Denmark59,10%
Austria57,90%
Finland54,50%
Czech Republic54,20%
United Kingdom, England)49,20%
Luxembourg44,50%
Slovakia42,10%
Poland41,80%
Estonia31,50%
Latvia25,50%
France25,30%
Germany21,30%
Flemish Belgium16,70%
Francophone Belgium1,40%
Sweden
Portugal
Cyprus
Slovenia
Holland
Greece

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IN SPAIN

Download the poster with the low vision situation in the pre-primary schools of Spain

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IN ITALY

Download the poster with the low vision situation in the pre-primary schools of Italy

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IN NORWAY

Download the poster with the low vision situation in the pre-primary schools of Norway

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This web platform is a result of the project: LOOKING OUT FOR A SCHOOL FOR ALL

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.

This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This publication is available in Open Access under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC-BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO) license (http:/ creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/).

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